2010 USFA LODD Report:Don’t Celebrate Too Soon

It's the second consecutive drop in total deaths, but is that really cause for joy?

Suppose you are a captain in charge of a army company consisting of roughly 200 soldiers. You and your company are deployed to an active war zone complete with a rear echelon and active areas of operation that have a varied frequency of engagement with the enemy. During your time on the ground you are responsible for civilian affairs, the training of new and current soldiers, deployment tactics, strategy for engaging the enemy and surviving. You are on a three year tour and receive a yearly report of your company's line of duty deaths.

During your third year you receive the year two combat fatalities report.

A total of 87 soldiers died in 83 incidents. 91 died in the first year.

22 soldiers died in activities related to combat operations.

16 soldiers died in vehicle accidents not related to improvised explosive devices.

15 soldiers dies from other causes while inside the FOB, firebase or CP.

12 soldiers die during in-country training.

So, while the number of total deaths dropped during your deployment, twice the number died this year doing other activities than those actually engaged in combat.

Is that progress?

Image above will take you to the USFA's announcement on the 2010 firefighter line of duty deaths.

The majority of our young men and women, and older ones too as the data shows, aren't all dieing inside burning buildings.

If this were combat, would we be happy?

 

FORWARD OPERATING BASE SHARANA, Afghanistan — A CH-47F from Task Force Attack, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, currently attached to 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division awaits a call to pick up soldiers they dropped off in eastern Afghanistan. (1st ACB, 1st Cav. Div. photo)

 

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Comments
Dave LeBlanc
Who Looks After The Victims?
Dave - I think the reason there is a debate is because the message is so contorted. From those that have chosen to manipulate the information to suit their position, the the ISFSI own website saying different things about what the tactics truly are. I agree 100% with giving everyone the information and letting them…
2014-11-20 22:06:56
Dave Skidmore
Who Looks After The Victims?
I'm glad you identified the "one issue no one is discussing, the lack of manpower on scene". My department runs a single apparatus, staffed with a minimum of 4 guys sometimes 5, with our second due being either our paid call or mutual aid - either option realistically being 10 plus minutes behind the first…
2014-11-19 22:01:40
Heath Smith
Who Looks After The Victims?
Great article Dave. I agree with your comment that "they became traditions because they work." And yes if you change the focus from life safety to your own safety how about holding a town meeting and letting those you swore to protect know whats going on, I am sure they will see your point!
2014-11-19 19:28:21
Ron Ayotte
Who Looks After The Victims?
Excellence as usual, Dave.
2014-11-19 03:39:35
Ron Ayotte
Your Eyes Are Useless When the Mind is Blind, Part III
David... excellent series.
2014-11-15 02:37:13
AFTDIMage
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